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The Justice Department Claims that Drugmaker Indivior Lied About Popular Opioid Treatment

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The Charges Against Indivior

On April 9, 2019, a grand jury in Virginia accused Indivior of conducting an illicit scheme to drive Suboxone sales. Prosecutors have charged Indivior with both fraud and conspiracy. They claim that the drug is prone to abuse and that Indivior not only did nothing to stop the abuse but actually misled the medical community in order to drive sales.

The Department of Justice (DoJ) is currently demanding Indivior to pay up at least $3 billion in fines. This is shocking, as the company only has a market value of £202 million. This paints a bleak picture of the company’s future.

According to the indictment, Indivior made numerous claims of the efficacy of Suboxone without any scientific evidence to support those claims. The DoJ has also claimed that Indivior deceived and intentionally misled health care providers into believing that Suboxone Film was a safer and less divertible option. Indivior also made it seem as if Suboxone Film was less abusable. All of these claims are false according to the prosecutors.

They further claim that the company used a “Here to Help Program” to further drive up their sales. This scheme encouraged physicians to prescribe Suboxone Film. They used this program to connect patients with doctors who prescribed their product. They also encouraged physicians to prescribe a higher dose than allowed and in “suspicious circumstances”.

“Indivior promoted [Suboxone] with a disregard for the truth about its safety and despite known risks of diversion and abuse.”

~ Assistant Attorney General Jody Hunt

Prosecutors claim that Indivior’s malicious actions have led it to become a huge contributor to the nation’s opioid epidemic.

Brian Mann, a reporter with North Country Public Radio, has been following the opioid crisis and this case. Here’s a recording of an interview that he recently had about the situation:

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12 Steps

Is 12-Step Abstinence the ONLY Way to Recover from Addiction?

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Does Controlled Drinking or Drug Use Work?

“…patients whose goal was total abstinence were more successful than those who had chosen to control their drinking.”

~ Dr. Kristina Berglund, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg

According to the disease concept of addiction, trying to bargain with or set limits on your drinking or drug use is one of the major signs of a severe problem.

Why is this?

The average drinker or recreational drug user doesn’t start a program like MM, AA, or NA without cause.  Rather, they attend meetings because they KNOW they have a problem. Most likely, that problem has somehow negatively impacted their life in some fashion—DUI charges, relationship issues, blackouts, health concerns, etc.

But despite such problems directly attributable to their substance use, a person in a MM program is looking for a way to keep drinking.

In a 2006 interview for Dateline, Kishline admitted as much.

Dateline: “As you look back on it, was MM something you devised to give yourself license to drink because you didn’t want to abstain?”

Kishline: “I do think that deep down as an addict that was the purpose.”

Dateline:  “All the good research that you did and the presentation of it to a national audience, it was really to justify it for you as a drinker.”

Kishline:  “It would legitimize my drinking.”

In 2000, while extremely drunk with a BAC that triple the legal limit, Kishline drove the wrong way down a Washington State interstate. She later confessed to “driving a hundred miles an hour in a total blackout”.

She had a head-on collision with another vehicle and killed a 38-year-old father and his 12-year-old daughter. For her crime, Kishline went to prison. When she was paroled 3 ½ years later, she relapsed several times. At one point, was even sent back for violating her parole by drinking.

For many years, Kishline continued to struggle, not only with her alcoholism but also with overwhelming guilt. Her drinking worsened and her disease progressed, resulting from the end of her marriage.  In 2015, just a few days before Christmas, Audrey Kishline Conn committed suicide in her mother’s home in Happy Valley, Oregon.

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12 Steps

Is 12-Step Abstinence the ONLY Way to Recover from Addiction?

Published

on

By

Does Controlled Drinking or Drug Use Work?

“…patients whose goal was total abstinence were more successful than those who had chosen to control their drinking.”

~ Dr. Kristina Berglund, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg

According to the disease concept of addiction, trying to bargain with or set limits on your drinking or drug use is one of the major signs of a severe problem.

Why is this?

The average drinker or recreational drug user doesn’t start a program like MM, AA, or NA without cause.  Rather, they attend meetings because they KNOW they have a problem. Most likely, that problem has somehow negatively impacted their life in some fashion—DUI charges, relationship issues, blackouts, health concerns, etc.

But despite such problems directly attributable to their substance use, a person in a MM program is looking for a way to keep drinking.

In a 2006 interview for Dateline, Kishline admitted as much.

Dateline: “As you look back on it, was MM something you devised to give yourself license to drink because you didn’t want to abstain?”

Kishline: “I do think that deep down as an addict that was the purpose.”

Dateline:  “All the good research that you did and the presentation of it to a national audience, it was really to justify it for you as a drinker.”

Kishline:  “It would legitimize my drinking.”

In 2000, while extremely drunk with a BAC that triple the legal limit, Kishline drove the wrong way down a Washington State interstate. She later confessed to “driving a hundred miles an hour in a total blackout”.

She had a head-on collision with another vehicle and killed a 38-year-old father and his 12-year-old daughter. For her crime, Kishline went to prison. When she was paroled 3 ½ years later, she relapsed several times. At one point, was even sent back for violating her parole by drinking.

For many years, Kishline continued to struggle, not only with her alcoholism but also with overwhelming guilt. Her drinking worsened and her disease progressed, resulting from the end of her marriage.  In 2015, just a few days before Christmas, Audrey Kishline Conn committed suicide in her mother’s home in Happy Valley, Oregon.

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Addiction & Relationships

Maintaining Sobriety during the Holidays

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The most wonderful time of the year? For most people, the holidays are stressful times filled with expectations, parties, and spending large amounts of money. However, for those who are struggling with addiction, the holidays can become an even more stressful time. Robert Castan and Janice Fulkerson from Northpoint Recovery spoke with Gemma Gaudette […]

The post Maintaining Sobriety during the Holidays appeared first on Drug & Alcohol Recovery Blog.

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