Connect with us

Balance

Yoga Journal's Response to the January 2019 Covers

Published

on


Tasha Eichenseher, Yoga Journal’s Brand Director, responds to the comments about the two covers.

I know this statement is not enough. It’s not possible to have a complete conversation about complicated topics via social media, or through a single article or magazine issue.

But we hear you.

Thank you for letting us know how the January/February issue made you feel. We are sharing the following response and reflection in order to acknowledge that we caused harm. With a dual cover, my team and I hoped to spark a conversation about leadership in yoga—to examine, to the degree we are able, the evolution of the practice over the past several decades and explore the roles of lineage, social media, and power dynamics. To us, both cover models—Jessamyn Stanley and Maty Ezraty—offer important perspectives in the context of that conversation. But I can see now how communities that have been disproportionately excluded from yoga, and Yoga Journal, may not have experienced it that way. Our intention didn’t align with the impact.

I am working to make Yoga Journal more representative—regarding age, race, ability, body type, yoga style, gender, and experience. We are committed to doing better and more, and to reaching out and understanding the ways in which systemic oppression plays out at Yoga Journal and every institution in this country. As we listen, absorb, and figure out how, we are bound to make mistakes, such as the unclear way in which we rolled out our recent issue.

Thank you again for speaking up, sharing your feedback, and engaging with us. Constructive engagement is how we will learn and grow. We will do the work to find clear, mindful ways to move forward. This may take time, but we are fully committed.

Please read below for the editor’s letter that accompanied the issue, introducing and explaining our choice to release dual covers.…

And here’s more about the dual cover strategy: Equal numbers of the issues are printed and they are delivered randomly; every other subscriber got every other issue. And you should see both on every newsstand that carries Yoga Journal.

In the spirit of peace, unity, and love that this practice inspires,

Tasha

The January 2019 Editor Letter

According to the United Nations, there are an estimated 2 billion people worldwide who practice yoga. That means there are 2 billion different ways yoga expresses itself and 2 billion different ways a yogi can look. At Yoga Journal, we want to honor everyone’s yogic path. Whether your practice is rooted in movement, breathwork, service, mantra, devotion, meditation, or study, you are moving toward awareness—and we want to support you along the way.

That’s why we’re making a few changes this year. We want to bridge old and new, the past and the future, in an effort to find common ground, to celebrate the benefits of the practice, and to help lead the community toward solutions to some of modern yoga’s biggest challenges including, but not limited to, accessibility, safety, abuse of power, and the best way forward. When you turn the pages of this redesigned magazine, scroll through our social feeds, visit our refreshed website, or listen to our new podcast, you’ll start to see (and hear) a more representative Yoga Journal—one where master teachers such as Maty Ezraty, who started YogaWorks, are paired with new yogapreneurs such as Jessamyn Stanley; one where you can find inspiration regardless of where you are on your yoga journey.

In 2019, you’ll find two different covers on most issues. We’re going to take more opportunities to share what yoga looks and feels like. To us, both Maty and Jessamyn represent important perspectives on leadership—our theme for this issue. Maty helped to popularize yoga, but she avoids social media and is worried about its ripple effects. Jessamyn is a relatively new teacher and rising social-media star. Her message of deep body acceptance is pioneering a new way of reaching people with the practice.

By bringing their voices together, along with the voices of other popular teachers and thought leaders, we aim to spark conversation about leadership in yoga: What form does it take? What form should it take? What roles do lineage and tradition play? How can the community chart a course forward that fosters respect, integrity, and inclusivity?

In the January 2019 issue, we also work with beloved Yoga Journal contributors Annie Carpenter, Sally Kempton, and Judith Hanson Lasater to offer up rock-solid asana, philosophy, and anatomy lessons. Plus, you’ll find yoga retreats that dovetail with leadership training to help you step into your own power. There’s also a chance to learn from the work of Exhale to Inhale, a nonprofit dedicated to bringing trauma-informed yoga to survivors of domestic and sexual assault. Finally, find freedom in ecstatic dance and parting words of wisdom on moving your practice off the mat and into the world—for the benefit of all.

About the Author
Tasha Eichenseher is the brand director of Yoga Journal.



Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Balance

5 Poses to Help You Unwind After Flying

Published

on

By


Whether you’re antsy after being cooped up for a while, jet-lagged, or seriously stiff, here’s your new post-flight go-to.

Feeling stiff, cranky, and tired after air travel? These are the best yoga poses to do after a flight to help you unwind and feel more rested and less stressed—instantly.

You made it—the end of your air travel. Despite long lines, annoying baggage fees, not-so-tasty airport food, and dueling wailing infants on either side of the aisle, you have arrived.

Once the aircraft has landed and the fasten seatbelt sign dings off, you stand up to prepare to disembark and notice how stiff your body is from the flight. Your upper back and neck are tight from carrying all of your bags. Your legs feel double their size and sore, despite so many hours of not moving. Your tummy hurts from not being able to stand up after your meal, and your bum feels numb from sitting for so long. Then, there’s possible jet-lag and pent-up stress to contend with.

Being sedentary under any circumstance isn’t great for your body, and being still while cramped on an airplane is even worse. After all, you’re breathing recirculated air and dealing with dehydration at 30,000-plus feet above sea level. Plus, the effects of stress (read: decreased immunity and digestive issues) make matters worse.

See also 5 Poses to Calm Your Pre-Flight Jitters

While there are some movements you can do in your seat to combat all of this, getting on the ground and moving wisely can make a big difference when it comes to countering the toll travel can take. Just as you unroll your yoga mat to open it up, this sequence will help you unravel your body to open yourself back up after flying. You can practice these poses while you are waiting for your luggage at baggage claim or looking for your Uber at the pick-up curb. Because each pose is a standing pose, it doesn’t matter if you don’t have much space or if your travel mat is still in your suitcase. 



Source link

Continue Reading

Balance

5 Poses to Calm Your Pre-Flight Jitters

Published

on

By


Feeling a little anxious before take-off? Find an empty-ish space near your gate to practice these postures.

As a yogi, you can learn a lot about your fears through your practice. Think about the first few times you practiced going upside down in Headstand or Handstand, or even when your teacher asked you to hold Chair Pose longer than what felt comfortable for you.

The good news? Facing your fears on the mat can help you feel prepared when you face fears off the mat. By getting to know your nervous system, you can learn how to find a steady and comfortable seat anywhere—whether it’s at the gate before you board, in your seat during turbulence, or before you land.

See also 9 Travel Hacks to Help You Find More Zen (Really!) on Your Next Flight

Try this 5-pose sequence to calm any nervous energy you might have before flying:

About the Author

Sarah Ezrin is a yoga teacher in San Francisco. Learn more at sarahezrinyoga.com. 



Source link

Continue Reading

Balance

5 Poses to Practice in a Cramped Airplane Seat

Published

on

By


It is possible to do some yoga on your next flight (yes, even if you’re stuck in a middle seat in coach)

These yoga poses will help you get through a long flight. 

Think you have to wait until you’re off the plane to get a good stretch? Think again. As crazy as it sounds, I promise you it is possible to practice yoga from the discomfort of your airplane seat.

Consider this: Yogis are primed to stay focused in less-than-ideal conditions. Remember that packed yoga class you were in that was mat to mat, yet you were able to focus on your own practice? Remember that time you were in a deep twist and were still able to breathe? Yoga teaches us to find inner space, regardless of outer conditions. In fact, the more inward our focus, the more expansive we feel. So, while we may not be able to stretch our legs out fully or do a Handstand in the airplane aisle, we can stretch our minds and find the space we seek within—yes, even when stuck in a cramped middle seat on a long flight.

See also Yoga at the Airport: 5 Poses for a Long Layover

Try this 5-pose sequence specifically designed to practice in your seat, with your seatbelt fastened.

About the Author

Sarah Ezrin is a yoga teacher in San Francisco. Learn more at sarahezrinyoga.com. 



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2018 A Touch of Health